Articles

Drive to increase DDT use in malaria war has stalled

Roger Bate | 10 Nov 2007 | The Standard (Kenya)

It is one drug that has raised hue and cry just as much as it has saved lives. DDT, which is the short form of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane has been used continually in public health programmes over the past 60 years. It has saved millions of lives from diseases such as malaria, typhus and yellow fever. Despite a public backlash in the 1960s, mainstream scientific and public health communities continued to recognise its utility and safety.

Last Chance for DDT

Roger Bate | 05 Nov 2007 | Wall Street Journal

Thanks to the pragmatism of African health officials and the efforts of some in the U.S. government, the insecticide DDT is still repelling and killing mosquitoes in Africa nations, saving thousands of people from malaria and other infectious diseases each year. But its days may be numbered. While the Bush administration and the World Health Organization have argued articulately in favor of DDT over the past two years, so-called environmentalists and those companies selling alternatives to DDT are pushing to prevent it from being deployed.

AFM Response to "WHO Promotes DDT?"

Richard Tren | 14 Oct 2007 | The Lancet

Hans Overgaard and Michael Angstreich argue in The Lancet Infectious Diseases (subscription required) that the World Health Organization (WHO) has consistently provided support for the use of DDT for malaria control. AFM responds to their miseading an dishonest arguments about DDT and WHO as well as to their characterization of AFM as an organization that promotes DDT as a "panacea for the world's malaria problems" here.

DDT use should not be politicised

Carlos Odora | 02 Sep 2007 | New Vision

On August 14, The New Vision reported that the people spraying houses in Munyonyo to control malaria were "resisted". This incident highlights the need for good information, education and communication in malaria control and also provides evidence of the damage that the highly politicised and damaging debate around the use of DDT has done for malaria control. 

Indoor Residual Spraying - Do it right

| 24 Aug 2007 | Africa Fighting Malaria

On August 14, 2007 Uganda's New Vision newspaper reported that malaria control spraymen were "resisted" in Munyonyo, a suburb of Kampala, as they attempted to conduct an indoor residual spraying program. This incident highlights the need for good information, education and communication in malaria control and also provides evidence of the damage that the highly politicized and damaging debate around the use of DDT has done for malaria control.

Uganda still needs to fight malaria

Carlos Odora | 01 Aug 2007 | New Vision

Malaria kills between 320-350 Ugandans daily. If these mortalities were accident induced, we would see tremendous national concern to halt them. Our best shot at the target is operating 300 pharmacies, 5,000 drug stores and the many private clinics, which according to the Uganda Bureau of Statistics, dispense up to 60% of the anti-malarials through the private sector.

Malaria Groups' Silence Enables Fatal Idiocy

Roger Bate | 10 May 2007 | Wall Street Journal

The malaria community must do more to combat the attacks on DDT.  At the moment their silence enables fatal idiocy.

Jumping Through WHOPES to Control Malaria

Richard Tren & Philip Coticelli | 25 Apr 2007 | TCS Daily

Many African countries are developing indoor residual spraying programs, some with DDT, a highly effective and safe insecticide proven to reduce the burden of malaria. Insecticide-treated mosquito net distribution, however, continues to dominate efforts. Our analysis shows that slow approvals for new net technologies have limited competition and wasted public funds for malaria control.

Honesty is a Virtue

Roger Bate & Kathryn Boateng | 24 Jan 2007 | Foreign Affairs

Failure to consider unfashionable modes of disease transmission or use proven but politically unpopular methods in disease prevention and control is illogical, dishonest, and should be exposed.

Re-Consider DDT Against Malaria

Roger Bate & Mauro De Lorenzo | 10 Jan 2007 | American Enterprise Institute

Rwanda's current policies will certainly save lives. But many more lives could be saved if Rwands adopts indoor residual spraying using DDT as part of its malaria control programme.